Inexpensive, Portable, Nondestructive Equipment Tests Bridge Capacity
A research team at Rutgers University has developed cost-effective, portable, nondestructive equipment to test bridge capacity....

Next Step: Observe, Teach, and Keep Learning
Norman Quach, P.E., S.E., is a senior bridge engineer at T.Y. Lin International in San Francisco. His advice to younger engineers is to never stop learning....

Drones Can Improve Bridge Inspections

Updating History
A beloved 1921 Parker truss bridge in Healdsburg, California, underwent an extensive rehabilitation and seismic retrofit so that the community could continue to use the historic crossing....

Chief Engineer: Washington Roebling, the Man Who Built the Brooklyn Bridge, By Erica Wagner. New York: Bloomsbury USA, 2017

Robotic Rebar-Tying System Uses Artificial Intelligence
A robotic rebar-tying system that uses artificial intelligence on bridge construction projects has been successfully tested in Pennsylvania....

Value Engineering Shaves Years and $1.8 Billion from Ohio River Bridges Project (part of "Attractive Alternative")
A value engineering process for the Ohio River Bridges Project, of which the Lewis and Clark Bridge is just one part, saved more than $1.8 billion and shaved nine years from earlier estimates....

Pedestrian, Cyclist Bridge in Utrecht Crosses School Roof and Canal

World’s Longest Pedestrian Bridge Opens in Switzerland

Risky Business: Identifying an Acceptable Rockfall Standard
For many parts of the U.S. highway system, cut slopes in rock are as common as bridges and embankments. These cut slopes, as well as some natural ones, produce rockfalls that pose risks to highway conditions...

Translating the Language of Soils: Developing a Soil Classification System for International Engineering Projects
Soil classification systems are used to help predict soil behavior and provide information to farmers, engineers, builders, agricultural extension agents, homeowners, community planners, and government...

Highway Retaining Walls are Assets: A Risk-Based Approach for Managing Them
Throughout history, retaining walls (RWs) have served a vital role in supporting civil infrastructure. The ruins of dry stone walls that purportedly supported the hills and slopes of ancient Rome can be...

Foundation Reuse and Enhancement: A Viable Option for Bridge Widening and Replacement Projects
The transportation system in the U.S. includes over 607,000 bridges for grade separations, interchange configurations, and stream crossings. As governmental entities embark on the rehabilitation and rebuilding...

The 2010-2011 Canterbury, New Zealand, Earthquake Sequence
Impetus for Rethinking the Way We Evaluate and Mitigate Liquefaction
Liquefaction is a common cause of ground failure during earthquakes and is directly responsible for tremendous damage to infrastructure. Evidence of the impact of liquefaction includes failure of bridge...

Offshore Technology in Civil Engineering
Hall of Fame Papers: Volume 11
Prepared by the Program Committee of the Offshore Technology Conference of the Coasts, Oceans, Ports, and Rivers Institute of ASCE<\p>Offshore Technology...

A Foundation Engineering Trip Down the Mississippi: Foundations for Mississippi River Bridges from Minnesota to Louisiana
Huckleberry Finn had his adventure, but for those interested in foundation engineering, this article will float you down the Mississippi River on your own encounter with the many bridges...

Spread Footings Revisited: Geotechnical Advances Lead to Expanded Use for Bridge Abutments
The Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) has historically used steel shell piles to support highway bridge structures, probably due to a blend of familiarity and efficiency among...

Screw Piles and Helical Anchors: 180 Years of Use in Geotechnical Engineering
Since 1836, screw piles and screw cylinders have been used successfully throughout the world to support a variety of large-scale, civil engineering structures. Their development and use...

Evaluating Bridges With Unknown Foundations for Susceptibility to Scour: North Carolina Applies Risk-Based Guidelines to Over 3,750 Bridges
Scour occurs when flowing water removes erodible material such as sand and rock. For bridges over water, scour affects the stability of pier and abutment foundations and contributes to...

Very Long-Term Care of Mechanically Stabilized Earth Berms: Limiting the Liability of Future Stakeholders
Since their development over 50 years ago, civil engineering applications of mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) berms have significantly increased. When used as a component of an asset...

 

 

 

 

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