Seismic Ground Motion and Attenuation Relationships

by S. E. Hough, Lamont-Doherty Geological, Observatory of Columbia Univ, United States,
A. Lerner-Lam, Lamont-Doherty Geological, Observatory of Columbia Univ, United States,
J. C. Gariel, Lamont-Doherty Geological, Observatory of Columbia Univ, United States,
P. A. Friberg, Lamont-Doherty Geological, Observatory of Columbia Univ, United States,
K. H. Jacob, Lamont-Doherty Geological, Observatory of Columbia Univ, United States,



Document Type: Proceeding Paper

Part of: Structural Safety and Reliability

Abstract: A key element in the assessment of seismic hazard is the estimation of how energy from a given earthquake is affected by crustal structure along the propagation path. There are recognized potential seismic sources in the eastern United States which have not generated earthquakes recently enough to have been recorded on modern instruments, and historical observation suggests that large population centers in the east can be affected by distant large events. In this paper, we summarize results of previous studies of attenuation and wave propagation, and illustrate how results from an over-simplified interpretation may be inadequate to accurately assess seismic hazard in a given area. There is a growing body of evidence which suggests that effects once thought to be of second-order importance can, in fact, be dominant factors in controlling ground motions at a site.

Subject Headings: Seismic tests | Ground motion | Seismic effects | Seismic waves | Sediment transport | Earthquakes | Wave attenuation | North America | United States

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