The Standard Contract's Delivery Commitment Schedule Process
The Standard Contract for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and/or High-Level Radioactive Waste specifies various activities necessary for the eventual acceptance of spent nuclear fuel...

Computer-aided Scheduling: Owner and Contractor Views

Construction Contract Documents for Stormwater Facilities
This paper provides an overview of the elements of an acceptable package of contract documents for stormwater facility construction. Thoughtful an meticulous assembly of contract documents...

Dealing with the Difficult Utility
The experience of an independent hydroelectric power developer, STS HydroPower, Ltd. (STS), involved in the full scope of hydroelectric activities is desribed. The purpose of the paper...

Manufacturing Planning 4 × 440 MW Turbines Short Delivery
DBS Escher Wyss Inc. is building the largest turbines ever to be manufactured in Canada for the third expansion of the Tarbela project in Pakistan; four (4) Francis turbines each rated...

Robert Moses Procurement and Model Tests — A Contractor's Perspective
This paper discusses (1) the need to provide realistic cost/benefit evaluation criteria in turbine bid specifications and (2) the benefits of competitive model testing. Recent procurement...

The Construction Business

CPM Techniques for Claims Avoidance and Preparation
Virtually all major construction claims consist of some aspects of delay, disruption or acceleration. Since all of the foregoing relate directly to the timing and sequencing of the project...

The Benefits of U.K. Guidance for Temporary Works
In British contracts the Contractor is responsible for the design and execution of temporary works unless the Design Engineer or the Client expressly instruct how the work is to be undertaken...

Legal Principles and Theories
Legal issues are intertwined with all aspects of the technical considerations relating to temporary structures. This paper presents an introduction to the legal theories which relate to...

Current Legal Issues Impacting Temporary Works in Construction
There are two evolving areas of legal concern to the engineer and contractor involved in any aspect of temporary construction. The interpretation and application of the Occupational Safety...

Historical Background
Discussions on payments for encountering unexpected conditions in construction commenced in 1960 and subsequent programs were presented in 1963, 1989 and 1991. The current symposium contains...

Who Pays for the Unexpected in Construction? A Heavy Construction Contractor's Viewpoint
The complex question of who pays for the unexpected in construction is analyzed using several examples from experience. In addition to the unexpected being due to subsurface conditions,...

Who Pays for the Unexpected in Construction?—Owner as Engineer's Point of View
In the case of an unexpected discovery or development, it potentially may evolve into a three-cornered dispute among the Owner, Engineer, and Contractor. Frequently, it may become a two-sided...

Who Pays for the Unexpected in Construction?
Unexpected events of major concern result from voluntary risks taken by one or more of the parties to a construction contract. The party taking the risk should reap the reward or pay the...

Who Pays for the Unexpected in Construction: The Geotechnical Contractor's Point of View
Unexpected conditions are inherent in most construction projects and often lead to claims and legal action. Contract risk avoidance language force owners, engineers and contractors to...

Who Pays for the Unexpected in Construction
A grouting contractor's point of view on who pays for the unexpected in construction is presented. Because grouting can be used as an alternative for other construction procedures,...

Who Pays for the Unexpected in Construction?—The Lawyer's Point of View
Encountering the unexpected is to be expected - it is one of the risks inherent in construction. While encountering the unexpected cannot be completely prevented, steps to (1) reduce the...

Who Pays for the Unexpected in Construction—An Architect's Viewpoint
As an Architect, who in the first instance is contractually obligated to address the full range of design discipline services, the question of 'who pays for the unexpected...

Who Pays for the Unexpected in Construction: Hi-Rise Engineers Point of View
The unexpected in high-rise construction can be traced to design criteria evolving from environmental models and probes, as well as 3 general problems dealing with quality control in contract...

 

 

 

 

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