Improving Construction Quality by Seeing What's Hidden Underground
One of the challenges of deep foundation projects is the inability to see what's being built at depth. Construction is hidden below ground, in soil or rock conditions that...

Geotechnical Design Over Karst. It's All About the Water
Karst is a type of topography which is formed over soluble rocks, such as limestone, dolomite, or gypsum. An irregular bedrock surface is typical of most karst areas, along with sinkholes,...

Karst-Related Sinkholes: Dynamic Compaction as an Effective Remediation Option
The paramount issue to address before constructing at sites underlain by karst topography is identification and remediation of sinkholes which exist close to the surface, and specifically...

Sudoku and Geotechnical Solutions: Lessons from a Parallel Universe of Limited Data
Geotechnical engineering relies on data to reduce risk. We infer, interpolate, and extrapolate based on often limited data with time and cost constraints also at work. Similarly, solving...

Enhanced Detection and Mapping of Buried Utilities—A Sustainability Perspective
The social and environmental impacts and benefits of projects make up the triple bottom line that represents a modern view of sustainable project development. Rather than considering only...

Risk and Performance of a Rock Cut Slope

A Culture of Unconditional Dedication to Safety

The Soil-Rock Boundary: What Is It and Where Is It?

From Casagrande's 'Calculated Risk' to Reliability-Based Design in Foundation Engineering: The 6th Arthur Casagrande Memorial Lecture

The Geotechnics of Converting Waste Sites to Renewable Energy Sites

Managing Risks Associated with Tunneling Projects

Structures Congress 2012
Forging Connections in the Windy City
Proceedings of Structures Congress 2012, held in Chicago, Illinois, March 29-31, 2012. Sponsored by the Structural Engineering Institute of ASCE. Structures Congress 2012 contains 202...

Quantifying Regional Risk Profiles Attributable to Sea Level Rise

Water Management in 2050

Integrated Water Management in 2050: Institutional and Governance Challenges

Flood Risk Management in 2050

The Science, Information, and Engineering Needed to Manage Water Availability and Quality in 2050

Visions of Green Technologies in 2050 for Municipal Resource Management

Future Prospects for Water Management and Adaptation to Change

Water Resource Management Modeling in 2050

 

 

 

 

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