Fire & Water

by Caitlin R. Proctor, Ph.D., Assistant professor of agricultural and biological engineering and environmental and ecological engineering at Purdue University.,
Andrew J. Whelton, Ph.D., Associate professor of civil engineering and environmental and ecological engineering at Purdue University.,
Amisha D. Shah, Ph.D., Assistant professor of civil engineering and environmental and ecological engineering at Purdue University.,
Juneseok Lee, P.E., Ph.D., (M.ASCE), Associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at Manhattan College.,
, D.WRE


2021


Serial Information: Civil Engineering—ASCE, 2022, Vol. 92, Issue 1, Pg. 42-47


Document Type: Feature article

Abstract: Over the years, wildfires have crept out of the wild and into the urban landscape, threatening more lives, property, and infrastructure than ever before, sometimes devastating communities. In Paradise, California, and the surrounding Butte County, 85 people lost their lives and an estimated 18,800 structures were destroyed because of the November 2018 Camp Fire. Damage to aboveground infrastructure is easy to observe and assess. However, communities are only just beginning to understand how their buried drinking water infrastructure can be damaged or compromised during these disasters. A response team from Purdue University and Manhattan College led an investigation into the damage sustained to Paradise’s drinking water infrastructure and came to some surprising conclusions.

Subject Headings: Infrastructure | Fires | Water management | Drinking water | Colleges and universities | Wild fires | Urban areas | Landscaping | California | United States

Services: Buy this book/Buy this article

 

Return to search