When AI Meets DIGGS — The Birth of a New Site Characterization Paradigm?

by Hui Wang, Ph.D., (A.M.ASCE), Assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Dayton in Dayton, OH.,
Xiangrong Wang, Ph.D., Senior tunneling engineer at AECOM Canada Ltd.’s Thornhill office in Ontario,
Robert Liang, P.E., Ph.D., (F.ASCE), Professor and chair of the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Dayton in Dayton, OH.,
Christopher Merklin, P.E., (M.ASCE), Administrator for the Office of Geotechnical Engineering at the Ohio Department of Transportation in Columbus, OH.,
Stephen Taliaferro, P.E., (M.ASCE), Assistant administrator for the Office of Geotechnical Engineering at the Ohio Department of Transportation in Columbus, OH.,



2021


Serial Information: Geo-Strata —Geo Institute of ASCE, 2021, Vol. 25, Issue 1, Pg. 38-45


Document Type: Feature article

Abstract: Drilling and sampling to obtain borehole logs, together with various in-situ testing, are usually performed to determine subsurface soil and rock profiles and their associated engineering properties. However, the number of borehole logs and in-situ testing locations might be limited for a geotechnical project site due to a tight budget and/or project schedule. As a result, subsurface soil and rock profiles and properties can only be investigated at spatially distributed locations where the boreholes are advanced. This means that subsurface conditions at other locations require interpretation — and with interpretation comes uncertainty.

Subject Headings: Field tests | Soil properties | Rock properties | Boring | Subsurface environment | Project management | Subsurface investigation | Soil tests

 

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