Evaluating the Energy and Carbon of Geotechnical Works: An Important Step in Developing Sustainable Designs

by Craig M. Shillaber, Ph.D., (A.M.ASCE), Assistant teaching professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Northeastern University in Boston, MA, c.shillaber@northeastern.edu,
James K. Mitchell, Sc.D., (Dist.M.ASCE), University Distinguished Professor Emeritus in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, VA, jkm@vt.edu,
Joseph E. Dove, Ph.D., (M.ASCE), associate professor of practice in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, VA, c.shillaber@northeastern.edu,


Serial Information: Geo-Strata —Geo Institute of ASCE, 2020, Vol. 24, Issue 5, Pg. 50-57


Document Type: Feature article

Abstract: Engineering for sustainable development requires considering the triple-bottom-line of social, economic, and environmental factors associated with a project when developing the final design. Within geotechnical engineering, much attention is given to meeting necessary performance criteria at the lowest cost while accounting for "local" environmental considerations (e.g., erosion and dust control, spoil/waste handling, noise). While this approach is effective in delivering safe and functional projects, it falls short in addressing the "big picture" environmental considerations that are needed to meet sustainable development goals.

Subject Headings: Sustainable development | Carbon fibers | Geotechnical engineering | Social factors | Economic factors | Project management | Occupational safety | Financial management

 

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