A Combo Foundation Does the Job: Piled-Raft Foundation Design for a Supertall Skyscraper

by James Sze, Director of infrastructure in the Geotechnics and Maritime Group at Ove Arup & Partners Hong Kong Limited in Hong Kong., james.sze@arup.com,
Alvin K. Lam, Associate director and East Asia skill leader in the Geotechnics and Maritime Group at Ove Arup & Partners Hong Kong Limited in Hong Kong., alvin.lam@arup.com,


Serial Information: Geo-Strata —Geo Institute of ASCE, 2019, Vol. 23, Issue 4, Pg. 42-49


Document Type: Feature article

Abstract: Lotte World Tower is a 123-story, 555-m supertall skyscraper with a 6-level basement for retail and car parking located at Jamsil-dong in Seoul, South Korea. (Editor’s Note: For additional information, see "Supertall in Seoul" in the July 2018 issue of CE Magazine, pp. 44-53.) The tower’s footprint is approximately 72 m x 72 m, and its structural form consists of a concrete core wall with eight peripheral 3.5 m x 3.5 m square-shaped mega-columns to resist both the gravity and lateral forces. To enhance structural rigidity, two belt trusses are positioned at levels 218 m and 347 m from the base of the foundation raft. The total serviceability gravity load is around 6,700 MN. The skyscraper opened to the public in April 2017 and is currently the tallest building in South Korea and the fifth tallest building in the world. A structure of such proportions demanded a foundation to resist immense loads and problematic subgrade.

Subject Headings: Gravity loads | Foundation design | High-rise buildings | Parking facilities | Basements | Automobiles | Concrete structures | Concrete | South Korea | Asia | Seoul

 

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