Landslides Driven by Extreme Events: Can We Learn More from More of Them?

by Dimitrios Zekkos, P.E., Ph.D., (M.ASCE), Associate professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Michigan and founder of ARGO-E, a civil engineering informatics firm., zekkos@geoengineer.org,
Marin Clark, Ph.D., (S.M.ASCE), Associate professor and acting chair of the Department of Earth and Environmental Systems at the University of Michigan., marinkc@umich.edu,
Weibing Gong, PhD student in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Michigan., wbgong@umich.edu,
John Manousakis, Ph.D., (A.M.ASCE), Surveying and geomatics engineer based in Athens, Greece., jmanousakis@elxisgroup.com,
William Greenwood, Assistant professor at San Jose State University and previously a PhD student in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Michigan., william.greenwood@sjsu.edu,


Serial Information: Geo-Strata —Geo Institute of ASCE, 2019, Vol. 23, Issue 3, Pg. 44-51


Document Type: Feature article

Abstract: Extreme events, such as earthquakes, hurricanes, or major storms, typically cause thousands of landslides in mountainous topography over the course of minutes to hours (Figure 1). In the last few years alone, we’ve witnessed more than 25,000 landslides during the 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha earthquake in Nepal, and more than 20,000 in the 2016 Mw 7.8 Kaikoura earthquake in New Zealand. The 2018 Mw 6.6 Hokkaido earthquake in Japan demonstrated the lethal combination of a rainy season followed by an earthquake, which led to significant parts of the landscape being scarred and stripped bare by adjacent landslides despite relatively flat topography. In 2018

Subject Headings: Earthquakes | Landslides | Disasters | Topography | Hurricanes and typhoons | Storms | Mountains | Developing countries | Asia | Nepal | New Zealand | Oceania | Japan

 

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