American Society of Civil Engineers


Comparison of Single- and Two-Bolted LVL Perpendicular-to-Grain Connections. II: Fracture Models


by Monil C. Patel, (Staff Engineer, Langan Engineering and Environmental Services, 619 River Dr. Center I, Elmwood Park, NJ 07407; formerly, Junior Project Engineer, Futurenet Group, 12801 Auburn St, Detroit, MI 48223.) and Daniel P. Hindman, (corresponding author), A.M.ASCE, (Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, 1650 Tech Center Dr., Blacksburg, VA 24061. E-mail: dhindman@vt.edu)

Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering, Vol. 24, No. 4, April 2012, pp. 347-355, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)MT.1943-5533.0000430)

     Access full text
     Purchase Subscription
     Permissions for Reuse  

Document type: Journal Paper
Abstract: Previous research of structural composite lumber connections loaded perpendicular to grain has shown brittle failure by splitting. In previous testing, two different laminated veneer lumber (LVL) materials with single and two bolts in a row loaded perpendicular to grain were compared with fracture mechanics models proposed by Van der Put and Jensen and splitting capacity equations from Eurocode No. 5. Connection strength values of two-bolt connections were larger than single-bolt connections owing to the increased distance to the farthest fastener. The first LVL material (LVL-1) had significantly larger predicted capacity strength values than the other LVL material (LVL-2) for the same configuration owing to larger mode I fracture energy and tension perpendicular-to-grain strength values. A rederivation of the brittle failure constant CI specifically for LVL materials would improve performance of Eurocode No. 5 predictions. The different fracture models had improved connection prediction values when the tension perpendicular-to-grain strength of the main member was included in the models. This property appears to be more important than shear properties for splitting behavior.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Bolted connections
Laminated materials
Cracking
Wood beams

Author Keywords:
Bolted connections
Laminated materials
Cracking
Wood beams
Wood connections