American Society of Civil Engineers


Use of Material Interfaces in DEM to Simulate Soil Fracture Propagation in Mode I Cracking


by Aruna Amarasiri, (Research Fellow, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Monash Univ., Victoria 3800, Australia. E-mail: Aruna.Amarasiri@monash.edu) and Jayantha Kodikara, (corresponding author), (Associate Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Monash Univ., Victoria 3800, Australia E-mail: Jayantha.Kodikara@monash.edu)

International Journal of Geomechanics, Vol. 11, No. 4, July/August 2011, pp. 314-322, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)GM.1943-5622.0000090)

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Document type: Journal Paper
Abstract: Mode I fracture is common in geomechanics in desiccation cracking, hydraulic fracture, and pressuremeter testing. The cohesive crack model has been used extensively and successfully in numerical modeling of such fracture in concrete and steel but has not been applied in modeling of soil fracture to the same extent. It is argued that the cohesive crack model may be more appropriate than linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) for soils because it takes into account finite tensile strength and any likely plasticity during fracture. With special reference to the Universal Distinct Element Code (UDEC) computer program, a methodology of using interfaces in the distinct element method (DEM) of analysis to model fracture has been validated herein, and this approach is considered to be useful in geomechanical modeling applications. The methodology is based on the cohesive crack approach and shows how softening laws could be back-calculated from load-displacement curves of test specimens. It has been validated using three geometries: a tension test with a rectangular cross section, a notched three-point bend beam, and a compact tension test. Approximate softening laws for St. Albans clay from Canada are proposed.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Clays
Elasticity
Failures
Laboratory tests
Numerical analysis
Plasticity
Cracking
Material tests

Author Keywords:
Clays
Elasticity
Failure
Laboratory tests
Numerical analysis
Plasticity