American Society of Civil Engineers


Acueducto Rio Colorado Tijuana Project


by Joel Olmos, P.E., (Engineering Manager, Water Transmission Group, Ameron International, 10681 Foothill Blvd, Suite 450, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730. E-mail: JOlmos@ameron.com), Sergio Ramírez, (Sales Engineer, Water Transmission Group, Ameron International, 10681 Foothill Blvd, Suite 450, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730. E-mail: SRamirez@ameron.com), and Marco Antonio Santacruz, (President, Constructora Makro, Blvd. Anahuac #1, Col. 3ra Etapa Rio Poniente, 22600 Tijuana, Baja California, México. E-mail: msantacruz@constructoramakro.com)
Section: Pipeline Planning and Design, pp. 1313-1321, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/41187(420)120)

     Access full text
     Purchase Subscription
     Permissions for Reuse  

Document type: Conference Proceeding Paper
Part of: Pipelines 2011: A Sound Conduit for Sharing Solutions
Abstract: The population growth in the cities of Tijuana, Rosarito and Tecate, Baja California, Mexico required an expansion of the supply of drinking water. A fifteen year concession was awarded to Administradora de Obras y Concesiones (AOC), a subsidiary of Constructora Makro, to finance 50% of the total construction cost and to design, build, and operate a new pipeline parallel to an existing pipeline. The Acueducto Rio Colorado Tijuana project was commissioned by the state of Baja California, Mexico, in 2007 and was completed in 2010. The project involved building approximately forty miles (64.4 km) of pipeline of 54-inch (1372 mm) and 60-inch (1524 mm) pipe diameters, and increasing the capacity of six existing pumping plants. Welded steel pipe was used with working pressure limits of 50 to 600 psi (3.5 – 42.2 kg/cm2). The project is the first of its kind under a new financial model where the government provides 50% of the cost of the project and the concessioner has to secure financing for the remainder of the project. In exchange, the government will enter into a long term contract to pay the concessioner for the transportation of the water. At the end of the term the concessioner will turn over the pipeline and operations to the government. This paper presents the project design, construction and financing of the new model used in Mexico to build new aqueducts to solve their pressing water needs.


ASCE Subject Headings:
California
Mexico
Water pipelines