American Society of Civil Engineers


Comprehensive Transportation Data Collection: Case Study in the Greater Golden Horseshoe, Canada


by Matthew J. Roorda, Ph.D., P.E., (corresponding author), (Assistant Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Univ. of Toronto, 35 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A4, Canada E-mail: roordam@ecf.utoronto.ca), Amer Shalaby, Ph.D., P.E., (Associate Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Univ. of Toronto, 35 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A4, Canada. E-mail: amer@ecf.utoronto.ca), and Sheyda Saneinejad, (M.A.Sc. Candidate, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Univ. of Toronto, 35 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A4, Canada. E-mail: s.saneinejad@utoronto.ca)

Journal of Urban Planning and Development, Vol. 137, No. 2, June 2011, pp. 193-203, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)UP.1943-5444.0000055)

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Document type: Case Studies
Abstract: This paper addresses two questions regarding transportation data collection in the Greater Golden Horseshoe, based on analysis of data needs and a review of international data collection practices. First, will the current data collection efforts provide sufficient information to answer key transportation questions that will arise over the next decade? Second, how should the household travel survey effectively be conducted in the future, recognizing significant technological and societal changes that are occurring? The paper recommends that major established data collection efforts be continued, prioritized gaps in transportation be addressed, and a continuous research program dedicated to survey methods research be developed. The paper also outlines a strategy for upgrading the household travel survey. An Internet version of the survey, a dual-frame sampling approach, a supplementary GPS-assisted survey, and consistency of the survey with previous implementations are recommended. The transportation data challenges faced in the Greater Golden Horseshoe are not unique to the region, and the recommendations made here are relevant to data collection programs in other peer jurisdictions worldwide.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Canada
Data collection
Global positioning systems
Planning
Surveys (non-geomatic)
Travel demand

Author Keywords:
Travel demand
Surveys
Data collection
Global positioning systems
Planning