American Society of Civil Engineers


Field Algae Measurements Using Empirical Correlations at Deer Creek Reservoir


by Ryan Stephens, (Graduate student, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602. E-mail: ras065@yahoo.com), Oliver Obregon, (Graduate student, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602. E-mail: oliveroob@byu.edu), Reed E. Chilton, (Graduate student, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602. E-mail: reedchilton@gmail.com), Gustavious P. Williams, (Associate Professor, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 368 Clyde Bld., Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602. E-mail: gus.williams@byu.edu), and E. James Nelson, (Professor, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 368 Clyde Bld., Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602. E-mail: jimn@byu.edu)
Section: Watersheds, pp. 3783-3791, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/41173(414)396)

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Document type: Conference Proceeding Paper
Part of: World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2011: Bearing Knowledge for Sustainability
Abstract: Deer Creek Reservoir in Utah has a history of high algae concentrations and despite recent nutrient reduction efforts, seasonal algae blooms continue. Cost effective, accurate, and comprehensive monitoring is important to understand the algal processes driving this problem. Current laboratory methods for accurately measuring algae are expensive and time consuming. In addition, laboratory methods require point samples, which do not describe the complex spatial, especially vertical, trends, in the algal data because of the limited number of samples taken. In situ probes are able to measure chlorophyll and provide a less expensive alternative for measuring chlorophyll than laboratory methods while also providing high resolution vertical profile measurements. They also measure data quickly which allows denser horizontal sampling. To use the probe data, good correlations between in situ probe chlorophyll measurements and laboratory algae measurements are important, but these correlations are reservoir and time dependant as reservoir conditions change. This study reports on efforts to develop these correlations and provide a general description of the dynamic reservoir algal processes at Deer Creek Reservoir.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Nutrients
Measurement
Reservoirs
Utah