American Society of Civil Engineers


Development of an Improved Approach for Selecting Storm-Water Best Management Practices


by Kevin D. Young, (corresponding author), (Research Associate, Via Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Virginia Tech, 200 Patton Hall, Blacksburg, VA E-mail: keyoung@vt.edu), Randel L. Dymond, M.ASCE, (Associate Professor, Via Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Virginia Tech, 200 Patton Hall, Blacksburg, VA. E-mail: dymond@vt.edu), and David F. Kibler, M.ASCE, (Professor Emeritus, Via Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Virginia Tech, 200 Patton Hall, Blacksburg, VA. E-mail: kiblerdf@vt.edu)

Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management, Vol. 137, No. 3, May/June 2011, pp. 268-275, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)WR.1943-5452.0000110)

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Document type: Journal Paper
Abstract: This paper discusses the development of a software-aided approach to best management practice (BMP) selection. Supported with input from a geographic information system (GIS), this software provides an algorithmic, mathematically based alternative to the inherently subjective approaches currently used to choose BMPs for management of storm-water runoff. The BMP selection software was applied to a study site located in the town of Blacksburg, Virginia. The software was utilized to identify BMP alternatives for a distributed storm-water management approach on the site. When compared with a base model with no runoff management, the traditional, detention-based management approach yielded 13.0% greater runoff rate reduction than did the distributed model. By contrast, the distributed storm-water management approach greatly outperformed the detention-based approach in removing pollutants from surface runoff. Although both runoff management strategies removed a significant portion of suspended sediment from the demonstration site’s runoff, the distributed model achieved a nearly 40% greater removal efficiency. Similarly, although both runoff management approaches remove a significant portion of total phosphorus from the demonstration site’s runoff, the distributed model achieved a 38% greater removal efficiency.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Best Management Practice
Stormwater management
Algorithms
Geographic information systems
Hydrologic models

Author Keywords:
Best management practices
Storm-water management
Algorithms
Geographic information system
Hydrologic modeling