American Society of Civil Engineers


Characterization of Mortar Using Calcified Cell-CaCO3by Microbial Biomineralization


by Wha-Jung Kim, (School of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701, Korea. E-mail: kimwj@knu.ac.kr), Woo-Young Chun, (School of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701, Korea. E-mail: cwy@knu.ac.kr), Jun-Seok Park, (School of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701, Korea. E-mail: junseok@knu.ac.kr), and Chang-Joon Lee, (School of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701, Korea. E-mail: cjlee4@knu.ac.kr)
Section: Posters, pp. 3171-3182, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/41171(401)276)

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Document type: Conference Proceeding Paper
Part of: Structures Congress 2011
Abstract: The limestone composed of calcium carbonate is an important resource as the main material for the cement, which is the basis of all construction materials, and most calcium in natural environment takes the morphology of calcium carbonate. This paper presents a basic study on the development of construction materials in an eco-friendly manner by using biomineralization of effective microorganisms. Micro-biologically induced calcite precipitation (MICP) was achieved using the effective microorganism, Sporosarcina pasteurii ATCC11859, an aerobic bacterium pervasive in natural soil deposits. This study searched beneficial microorganisms inhabiting on the based experimental method (16S rDNA base sequence analysis, the EDTA titration method, and X-ray diffraction analysis) of using standard cultured microorganism, Sporosarcina pasteurii ATCC11859, to separate and identify eight new beneficial microorganisms, Sporosarcina soli KNUC401, Bacillus massiliensis KNUC402, Arthrobacter crystallopoietes KNUC403, Lysinibacillus fusiformis KNUC404, Halomonas aquamarina WC-1, Halomonas hydrothermalis WC-2, Bharhavaea cecembensis JC-1, Microoccus yunnanensis JC-2, producing calcite (a mineral morphology of calcium carbonate), for basic research. The result of this study, bio-mineral characteristics of these microorganisms, has been researched. This research, which used eight newly identified effective microorganisms, may be premature for its application to actual situation and thus needs further consideration for advanced research in the future. The effect of the application of calcified Cell-CaCO3 to mortar performance can lead to the development of a new material that will contribute to alleviation of environmental problems as well as facilitation of concrete remediation and repair work. The results of this experiment showed formation of calcite and hardening of mortar surface. Scanning electron micrographs (SEM) verified formation with precipitated calcite forming bonds at particle-particle contacts. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed that the observed calcite was comprised of calcium carbonate. Additionally, the basic experiment indicated that mortar pores could be filled by calcified Cell-CaCO3 with microorganisms and calcite complex structure.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Mortars
Biological processes
Microbes