American Society of Civil Engineers


The Effect of Freezing-Thawing Cycles on Performance of Fly Ash Stabilized Expansive Soil Subbases


by Sazzad Bin-Shafique, (Associate Professor, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, Texas 78249. E-mail: sshafique@utsa.edu.), K. Rahman, (Senior Engineering Associate, Public Works Department, City of San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78283. E-mail: Saifur_buet@yahoo.com.), and Ireen Azfar, (Graduate student, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, Texas 78249. E-mail: iazfar@sbcglobal.net.)
Section: Foundations and Ground Improvement, pp. 697-706, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/41165(397)72)

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Document type: Conference Proceeding Paper
Part of: Geo-Frontiers 2011: Advances in Geotechnical Engineering
Abstract: This study describes the laboratory evaluation of the effect of freezing-thawing cycles on strength and swell potential of fly ash and randomly oriented fiber stabilized expansive soil subbases. Two high plasticity expansive clay soils were mixed with a Class C fly ash and artificial fibers, and then compacted to prepare specimens for all combinations for fly ash contents of 0%, 10%, and 20%, and a fiber content of 1%. After curing all specimens for seven days, the first set was subjected to unconfined compression tests, split tensile tests, and vertical swell tests. Similar tests were also conducted on another three sets of specimens after being subjected to 24 freezing-thawing cycles in a laboratory controlled environment. The freezing-thawing cycles significantly decreased the strength and increased the swell potential.However, the fiber inclusion minimized the potential for strength loss and swelling of expansive soil due to freezing-thawing cycles.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Freeze and thaw
Expansive soils
Fly ash
Subbase course