American Society of Civil Engineers


Simplifying Upper Diamond Fork System Hydraulic Operations


by H. Lee Wimmer, (CUPCA Program Manager, Central Utah Water Conservancy District (CUWCD); 355W Univ. Pkwy, Orem, UT 84058. E-mail: lee@cuwcd.com) and Nathaniel Jones, (Design Manager, CH2M HILL, Inc.; 215 S. State St., Ste 1000, Salt Lake City, UT, 84111. E-mail: njones2@ch2m.com)
Section: Design, pp. 486-495, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/41138(386)47)

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Document type: Conference Proceeding Paper
Part of: Pipelines 2010: Climbing New Peaks to Infrastructure Reliability: Renew, Rehab, and Reinvest
Abstract: When Monks Hollow Reservoir, was eliminated by environmental conflicts, Central Utah Water Conservancy District’s (CUWCD) had to redesign their Diamond Fork System without its central operating storage. Finding a hidden asset in their commitment to augment Diamond Fork Creek flows to enhance its fishery, they designed two large pressure reducing stations to constantly "trickle flows" to the creek. This created a simple hydraulic system with its daily and hourly operating storage 2000-feet above the main aqueduct gradient. The new, more efficient, system has all the benefits of major storage at aqueduct gradient, but eliminates its liabilities: water losses to evaporation, reservoir O&M, and canyon environmental impacts.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Hydraulics
Utah
Colorado River
Streamflow