American Society of Civil Engineers


Impact of Safe Routes to School on Student Travel Mode Shifting: Based on the Before and After Period Survey


by Jiguang Zhao, (Department of Civil Engineering, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL, 62026-1800. E-mail: jzhao@siue.edu), Huaguo Zhou, (Department of Civil Engineering, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL, 62026-1800. E-mail: hzhou@siue.edu), Jing Huang, (Department of Civil Engineering, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL, 62026-1800. E-mail: jinghuang0625@gmail.com), and Peter Hsu, (Florida Department of Transportation, 11201 N McKinley Dr., Tampa, FL 33612. E-mail: ping.hsu@dot.state.fl.us)
Section: Transportation Management, Operation Technology and Systems, pp. 1645-1656, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/41127(382)179)

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Document type: Conference Proceeding Paper
Part of: ICCTP 2010: Integrated Transportation Systems: Green, Intelligent, Reliable
Abstract: An evaluation of the effectiveness of the Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program was conducted with data collected before and after the implementation of the SRTS improvements at thirteen schools in Hillsborough County, Florida. Descriptive Statistics indicate that the students’ walking/biking rates and participants’ subjective feelings toward walking/biking activity improved significantly at some schools. Those schools with significant increase in walking/biking rates have similar characteristics. The school-level walking/biking rates and associated factors are discussed. A linear regression model is established to estimate the school-level walking/biking rates. Students’ walking/biking rates is a function of weighted distance to school, weighted grade level, male student percentage, and average student family size. Other factors not included in the model, such as the walking/biking environments in school areas, are found to play an important role as well. Model calibration results indicate a school flasher sign alone could increase the school-level walking/biking rates by about 3%.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Surveys (non-geomatic)
Traffic safety
Travel modes