American Society of Civil Engineers


Repair of Concrete Pressure Pipes with CFRP Composites


by M. S. Zarghamee, F.ASCE, (Senior Principal, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc., 41 Seyon St., Bldg. 1, Suite 500, Waltham, MA 02453 E-mail: mszarghamee@sgh.com), M. Engindeniz, M.ASCE, (Staff-Structures, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc., 41 Seyon St., Bldg. 1, Suite 500, Waltham, MA 02453 E-mail: mengindeniz@sgh.com), O. O. Erbay, (Senior Staff-Structures, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc., 41 Seyon St., Bldg. 1, Suite 500, Waltham, MA 02453 E-mail: ooerbay@sgh.com), and R. P. Ojdrovic, M.ASCE, (Associate, Principal, Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc., 41 Seyon St., Bldg. 1, Suite 500, Waltham, MA 02453 E-mail: rpojdrovic@sgh.com)
Section: Concrete and Masonry Structures, pp. 1874-1884, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/41130(369)171)

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Document type: Conference Proceeding Paper
Part of: Structures Congress 2010
Abstract: This paper proposes a design framework for CFRP liners for concrete pressure pipes with different levels of degradation in an attempt to form the basis of a design standard. Design approach considers non-degraded, degraded, and severely degraded pipes where the effects of loads on the CFRP liner may be different due to pipe flexibility, initial imperfections in geometry, and quality of bond to host pipe. Loads and limit states that govern the design are defined. A detailed nonlinear finite element analysis is presented to demonstrate the determination of loads on the pipe. The requirements for qualification of materials and contractor, and importance of quality control during and after construction are highlighted based on experience gained in design, construction, and inspection of CFRP liners.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Rehabilitation
Concrete pipes
Pressure pipes
Composite materials
Fiber reinforced polymer