American Society of Civil Engineers


Governance Challenges of Infrastructure Delivery: The Case for Socio-Economic Governance Approaches


by Raymond E. Levitt, (Collaboratory for Research on Global Projects, Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305-4020. E-mail: ray.levitt@stanford.edu), Witold Henisz, (UPS Visiting Associate Professor of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, CA 94305-4020; Wharton School of Business, University of Pennsylvania. E-mail: henisz@wharton.upenn.edu), W. Richard Scott, (Collaboratory for Research on Global Projects, Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305-4020. E-mail: scottwr@stanford.edu), and Daniel Settel, (Collaboratory for Research on Global Projects, Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305-4020. E-mail: dsettel@stanford.edu)
Section: Organizational Leadership and Management, pp. 757-767, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/41109(373)76)

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Document type: Conference Proceeding Paper
Part of: Construction Research Congress 2010: Innovation for Reshaping Construction Practice
Abstract: Research on governance of infrastructure projects has explored who should optimally own and operate these assets. Instead, we focus on a set of governance challenges that arise systematically during the project shaping, design, construction and operation phases of infrastructure projects. Importantly, project decisions at one stage can limit choice options and compromise financial, environmental and socio-political sustainability in subsequent stages. This paper discusses how these challenges arise within different phases of the infrastructure project lifecycle and propagate across phases; it shows how poorly traditional financing and governance approaches have addressed these challenges on past infrastructure projects; and it proposes socio-economic approaches that have the potential to address the governance requirements of future infrastructure projects more fully.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Infrastructure
Project delivery
Social factors
Economic factors
Case studies