American Society of Civil Engineers


Quality Assessment and Quality Control of Deep Soil Mixing Construction for Stabilizing Expansive Subsoils


by Raja Sekhar Madhyannapu, Ph.D., (Former Doctoral Student, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Univ. of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019.), Anand J. Puppala, Ph.D., P.E., (corresponding author), (Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Univ. of Texas at Arlington, Box 19308, Arlington, TX 76019 E-mail: anand@uta.edu), Soheil Nazarian, Ph.D., P.E., (Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Univ. of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968.), and Deren Yuan, Ph.D., (Research Specialist, Center for Transportation Infrastructure Systems, Univ. of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968.)

Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering, Vol. 136, No. 1, January 2010, pp. 119-128, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)GT.1943-5606.0000188)

     Access full text
     Purchase Subscription
     Permissions for Reuse  

Document type: Journal Paper
Abstract: This paper presents the process and results of a quality management program performed during and immediately after the construction of two deep soil mixing (DSM) test sections. The quality management program consisted of laboratory, in situ, and mineralogical tests to address the effectiveness of the treatment during and after construction. In situ investigations including the down-hole seismic and spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) test methods were performed to evaluate the degree of improvement achieved through the measurement of compression and shear-wave velocities of the columns and surrounding soils. Scanning electron microscopy and electron dispersive x-ray analysis were performed on raw, laboratory treated and field-treated specimens for qualitative understanding of the degree of mixing achieved in the field and the compounds formed at particle level during stabilization, respectively. Laboratory tests results on field cores indicated that both field stiffness and strength are about 20 to 40% less than the corresponding laboratory prepared soil samples. The down-hole seismic and SASW tests showed considerable improvement in stiffness in and around the DSM columns. Mineralogical studies indicated the formation of silica and alumina hydrates along with interwoven structure of lime-cement treated clay particles in both laboratory and field specimens, suggesting adequate mixing of the soil and binder in both environments.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Expansive soils
Lime
Cement
Soil mixing
Shear modulus
Nondestructive tests
Quality control

Author Keywords:
Expansive soils
Lime
Cement
Soil mixing
Shear modulus
Nondestructive tests