American Society of Civil Engineers


Fenton Process for Landfill Leachate Treatment: Evaluation of Biodegradability and Toxicity


by Anna Goi, Ph.D., (corresponding author), (Senior Researcher, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Tallinn Univ. of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, Tallinn 19086, Estonia E-mail: goi@staff.ttu.ee), Yelena Veressinina, (Researcher, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Tallinn Univ. of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, Tallinn 19086, Estonia. E-mail: veressinina@staff.ttu.ee), and Marina Trapido, Ph.D., (Associate Professor, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Tallinn Univ. of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, Tallinn 19086, Estonia. E-mail: mtrapido@staff.ttu.ee)

Journal of Environmental Engineering, Vol. 136, No. 1, January 2010, pp. 46-53, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)EE.1943-7870.0000132)

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Document type: Journal Paper
Abstract: The single Fenton or the Fenton process implemented in combined scheme as a posttreatment after the ferric chloride coagulation was applied for leachate collected from a real waste disposal site. Depending on the ratios of H2O2/chemical oxygen demand, H2O2/Fe2+, and pH, the Fenton oxidation or both the Fenton oxidation and the Fenton coagulation were involved in chemical oxygen demand reduction. The implementation of ferric chloride coagulation as a pretreatment stage or acidification of raw leachate did not result in the improvement of chemical oxygen demand reduction efficacy of the following Fenton process comparing with that obtained by the direct Fenton treatment of raw leachate. The direct Fenton treatment with a higher (3/1) H2O2/chemical oxygen demand ratio applied to raw leachate without pH preadjustment (H2O2/Fe2+=10/1), produced more oxidized organic compounds (measured as dissolved organic carbon/chemical oxygen demand ratio), more biodegradable by-products (measured as a 7-day biological oxygen demand/chemical oxygen demand ratio), and required a considerably lower dosage of NaOH for neutralization, making it preferable for the leachate treatment. Although up to a twofold reduction in the toxicity was observed after the overall Fenton process application, the treated leachate remained extremely toxic to Daphnia magna.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Coagulation
Oxidation
Hydrogen peroxide
Optimization
Landfills
Toxicity
Biological processes
Waste treatment

Author Keywords:
Coagulation
Oxidation
Hydrogen peroxide
Optimization
Efficacy