American Society of Civil Engineers


Pollutant Transport within the Vadose Zone: Interactions of Soil Horizon Chemistry on Water Quality


by Daniel P. Treese, (Environmental Pollution Control Program, The Pennsylvania State University, Harrisburg E-mail: dpt117@psu.edu), Shirley E. Clark, Ph.D., P.E., D.WRE, (Environmental Pollution Control Program, The Pennsylvania State University, Harrisburg), J. Bradley Mikula, (Environmental Pollution Control Program, The Pennsylvania State University, Harrisburg), and Katherine H. Baker, Ph.D., (Environmental Pollution Control Program, The Pennsylvania State University, Harrisburg)

pp. 1451-1459, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/41036(342)143)

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Document type: Conference Proceeding Paper
Part of: World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers
Abstract: Hydrologic cycle restoration is the primary objective of stormwater management. Infiltration and biofiltration systems composed of engineered soils have become a preferred tool for obtaining this objective while also providing pollutant removal. It is desirable, though, to limit soil disturbance and incorporate native soils. The use of native soils requires a fundamental understanding of their behavior towards water transport and pollutant treatment. Their structure is not homogeneous but instead contains several layers, or "horizons," each with differing pollutant removal capacity. The ability of the various horizons to treat runoff was investigated over 40 simulated storm events in two soil types, a Wharton silt loam and Leetonia loamy sand. Effluent water results showed leaching of total nitrogen and removal of total phosphorus by all soil horizons of both soil types. Potassium leached from the organic horizons of both soils, the silt loam showed removal by lower horizons while the loamy sand did not. All soil horizons of both soil types lowered the pH of influent stormwater and increased conductivity, turbidity, color, and hardness.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Pollutants
Chemicals
Water quality
Stormwater management