American Society of Civil Engineers


Elevated Temperature Properties of ASTM A992 Steel


by Guanyu Hu, (Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin E-mail: guanyu@mail.utexas.edu), Mohammed Ali Morovat, (Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin E-mail: morovatma@mail.utexas.edu), Jinwoo Lee, (Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin E-mail: jinwoo@mail.utexas.edu), Eric Schell, (Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin E-mail: eschell@mail.utexas.edu), and Michael Engelhardt, (Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin E-mail: mde@mail.utexas.edu)
Section: Highlights of Research in Texas—Concrete Structures, pp. 1-10, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/41031(341)118)

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Document type: Conference Proceeding Paper
Part of: Structures Congress 2009: Don’t Mess with Structural Engineers: Expanding Our Role
Abstract: There is an increasing interest in the US in developing engineered approaches to structural fire safety as an alternative to conventional code-based prescriptive approaches. With an engineered approach, the response of a structure to fire is computed and appropriate design measures are taken to assure acceptable response. In the case of steel buildings, one of the key elements of an engineered approach to structural fire safety is the ability to predict the elevated temperature properties of structural steel. The properties of steel at high temperatures can be drastically different from those at room temperature, and accurate knowledge of these properties is a critical factor in predicting response of steel structures to fire. Although several past studies have examined elevated temperature properties of structural steel, there are some important gaps in the experimental database. Specifically, little data is available on ASTM A992 steel, the most common grade of structural steel currently used for wide flange shapes in the US. Furthermore, past studies have not adequately examined the important role of strain rate in tension testing at elevated temperatures. This paper will present preliminary results of a series of tension tests on A992 steel conducted at temperatures up to 900°C.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Temperature effects
Steel