American Society of Civil Engineers


Using Climatic Data and Evapotranspiration Requirements to Estimate Corn Production Profitability with Optimal Irrigation Levels in the Texas Panhandle


by W. Arden Colette, (Professor of Agricultural Economics, Department of Agricultural Sciences, West Texas A&M University; WTAMU Box 60998, Canyon, Texas 79016 E-mail: acolette@wtamu.edu), Lal K. Almas, (Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics, Department of Agricultural Sciences, West Texas A&M University; WTAMU Box 60998, Canyon, Texas 79016 E-mail: lalmas@wtamu.edu), and Clay Robinson, (Professor of Soil Science, Department of Agricultural Sciences, West Texas A&M University; WTAMU Box 60998, Canyon, Texas 79016 E-mail: crobinson@wtamu.edu)

pp. 1-10, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/40976(316)108)

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Document type: Conference Proceeding Paper
Part of: World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2008: Ahupua’A
Abstract: The performance of the agricultural sector in the Texas Panhandle is dependent on irrigation. The declining availability of irrigation water from the Ogallala aquifer combined with increasing energy costs make irrigation strategies much more critical. Economic viability and resource conservation are not mutually exclusive. Selecting an irrigation level maximizes profits both increases profits and conserves the water resource as compared with a strategies of maximizing yield per acre. Under average precipitation, a management strategy that irrigates to maximize yield reduces profit by between $22 and $158 per acre and increases water consumption by 2.21 and 11.20 acre inches depending on the combination of corn and natural gas prices. Adopting a profit maximizing strategy is a win-win situation both economically and for water resource conversation.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Evapotranspiration
Crops
Agriculture
Irrigation
Texas