American Society of Civil Engineers


Public Acceptance of Structural Solutions to Hurricane Damage in Post-Katrina Mississippi


by John N. Baehr, (US Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile District, 109 St. Joseph St., Mobile, AL 36608 E-mail: john.n.baehr@usace.army.mil), Susan I. Rees, (US Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile District, 109 St. Joseph St., Mobile, AL 36608 E-mail: susan.i.rees@usace.army.mil), Todd H. Boatman, (US Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile District, 109 St. Joseph St., Mobile, AL 36608 E-mail: todd.h.boatman@usace.army.mil), and Jeremy M. Ladart, (US Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile District, 109 St. Joseph St., Mobile, AL 36608 95060 E-mail: jeremy.m.ladart@sam.usace.army.mil)
Section: Community Hazard Response and Planning, pp. 806-817, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/40968(312)72)

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Document type: Conference Proceeding Paper
Part of: Solutions to Coastal Disasters 2008
Abstract: The impacts of Hurricane Camille in 1969 had faded as development along Mississippi’s coast intensified. Thirty six years later, Hurricane Katrina in Mississippi exceeded 125 billion dollars in damages and resulted in the loss of 238 lives. After Katrina, Congress tasked Mobile District to complete a comprehensive study on what steps could be taken to help prevent future hurricane damage on Mississippi’s Coast. A structural "Lines of Defense" concept was drafted that started with the offshore barrier islands and progressed inland. Other storm reduction concepts were also considered. As structural concepts were presented during public workshops, the idea of limited hurricane defense was favored as long as it was "not in my backyard". Now re-development in flood-prone areas has begun. Along with the rush back to the waterfront, many types of surge defenses are now being shunned if they affect the aesthetic appeal along the coast.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Hurricanes
Damage
Mississippi
Coastal environment