American Society of Civil Engineers


Architectural and Engineering Fees from the Public Institutional Perspective


by M. L. Feldmann, Ph.D., (corresponding author), (Director, Institutional Res., Blackburn Coll., 700 College Avenue, Box 1049, Carlinville, IL 62626 E-mail: matt.feldmann@backburn.edu), Donald Chrusciel, Ph.D., (Assoc. Dir. for Faciltiies, Planning and Mgmt., 108 General Services Bldg., Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA 50011-4001), Andreas Pohlmann, (Graduate Student, Business Education, Humboldt Univ., Berlin, Germany. E-mail: andijpohlmann@gmx.de), Mack C. Shelley, II, Ph.D., (Professor, Statistics and Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, E005A Lagomarcino Hall, Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA 50011-3180), Kelly McCool, (Program Coordinator in Facilities, Planning, and Mgmt., 108 General Services Bldg., Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA 50011-4001), A. Dean Morton, (Univ. Archt., 200 General Services Bldg., Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA 50011-4021), and Christopher K. Ahoy, (Assoc. Vice Pres. for Facilities, Planning and Mgmt., 108 General Services Bldg., Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA 50011-4001)

Journal of Management in Engineering, Vol. 24, No. 1, January 2008, pp. 2-11, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)0742-597X(2008)24:1(2))

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Document type: Journal Paper
Abstract: Using data obtained from the University Project Cost and Efficiency Benchmark Study a new approach was developed to identify the drivers of architectural and engineering services costs (A/E fees). A/E fees are typically identified as a percentage of total construction costs and often are separated by project complexity. For example, residence halls, classroom buildings, and research buildings are perceived to have differing complexity, resulting in differences in A/E fees. The prediction model accounted for 45.9% of the variance in A/E costs, and project complexity was not a significant predictor of A/E costs. The paper is of interest to practicing consulting civil engineers and researchers because it provides evidence to refute the statement proposed by Carr and Beyor [(2005), J. Manage. Eng., 21(3), 110.117] that civil engineering fees are declining due to stagnant fee curves. This study establishes an alternate method for defining a fee schedule based on actual costs and provides evidence that fee schedules do not reflect the actual fees paid to A/E professionals.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Budgets
Construction management
Fees
Financial factors
Partnerships