American Society of Civil Engineers


Cement Treatment of Frost-Susceptible New England Base Materials Blended with Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement


by H. J. Miller, (Department of Civil Engineering, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, N. Dartmouth, MA 02747; E-mail: hmiller@umassd.edu), W. S. Guthrie, (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602; E-mail: guthrie@byu.edu), M. Kestler, (U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Laconia, NH 03246; E-mail: mkestler@fs.fed.us), and C. Carbo, (Northeast Cement Shippers Association, Cambridge, MA 02138 E-mail: ccarbo@necementshippers.com)

pp. 1-11, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/40836(210)58)

     Access full text
     Purchase Subscription
     Permissions for Reuse  

Document type: Conference Proceeding Paper
Part of: Cold Regions Engineering 2006: Current Practices in Cold Regions Engineering
Abstract: Full-depth recycling in conjunction with cement stabilization is an increasingly popular method of reconstructing deteriorated asphalt pavements; in cold regions, cement treatment is especially useful for improving the strength and durability of frost-susceptible materials. The purpose of this research was to characterize the properties of cement-treated base materials constructed from reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and aggregate materials obtained from several locations in New England. The aggregates and RAP were blended in approximately equal proportions by weight, and extensive laboratory testing was performed to evaluate the strength and durability of each blend in the untreated condition and after treatment with various levels of cement. Testing included determinations of particle-size distributions, moisture-density relationships, unconfined compressive strengths, and moisture susceptibility classifications for the materials. The results of the laboratory testing were used to establish design parameters for field test sections constructed in the summer of 2005. Field testing, including stiffness evaluations using a falling-weight deflectometer, was conducted to characterize the structural properties of both cement-treated and untreated sections subjected to early trafficking. This research suggests that modest amounts of cement can greatly improve the strength and durability of base materials, which should in turn increase their resistance to frost damage.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Asphalt pavements
Base course
Cement
Frost
New England
Recycling