American Society of Civil Engineers


Increased Roughness in Reinforced Concrete Box Culverts


by Adam S. Hill, (EIT, Graduate Research Assistant; Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Washington State University, PO Box 642910, Pullman, WA 99164-2910 E-mail: ashill@wsu.edu), Rollin H. Hotchkiss, Ph.D., P.E., D.WRE, (Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Brigham Young University, 370 Clyde Building, Provo, UT 84602 E-mail: rhh@byu.edu), Kayla M. Culmer, (Undergraduate Research Assistant, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Washington State University, PO Box 642910, Pullman, WA 99164-2910), and Michael A. Miraglio, III, (Undergraduate Research Assistant, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Washington State University, PO Box 642910, Pullman, WA 99164-2910)

pp. 1-10, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/40856(200)181)

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Document type: Conference Proceeding Paper
Part of: World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2006: Examining the Confluence of Environmental and Water Concerns
Abstract: This paper presents results of an experimental investigation to increase roughness within the barrel of a concrete box culvert using trapezoidal-shaped corrugations with a shape similar to pavement underlay on bridge decks. Half-scale corrugations were placed on the bottom and both sides of a tilting flume 21 meters long, 0.90 meters wide, and 0.53 meters deep in Albrook Hydraulics Laboratory at Washington State University. During the experiment, wood cut to the shape of bridge decking simulated the concrete forms expected to be used in the field. Experimental flow rates ranged from 24–144 L/s. Experimental slopes ranged from 0.3–10.1%. Depths were measured with a point gage in several points upstream of corrugations, within the corrugations, and downstream of corrugations. Depths were measured at both the crest and the trough within corrugations. Manning’s n was found to be dependent on the submergence ratio in a power function. In a range of submergence ratios between 1.33 and 3.0, the Manning’s n ranged from 0.03–0.05 after scaling to full size. This increase in Manning’s n would lead to a 40–60% velocity reduction in full scale conditions.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Culverts
Hydraulic roughness
Reinforced concrete