American Society of Civil Engineers


Structural Design Challenges for the New York Times Building


by Thomas Z. Scarangello, P.E., (Managing Principal, The Thornton-Tomasetti Group, 641 Ave. of the Americas, New York, NY, 10011 E-mail: tscarangello@thettgroup.com), Kyle E. Krall, P.E., (Vice-President, The Thornton-Tomasetti Group, 641 Ave. of the Americas, New York, NY, 10011 E-mail: kkrall@thettgroup.com), and Jeffrey A. Callow, (Senior Engineer, The Thornton-Tomasetti Group, 641 Ave. of the Americas, New York, NY, 10011 E-mail: jcallow@thettgroup.com)
Section: Buildings, pp. 1-9, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/40753(171)67)

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Document type: Conference Proceeding Paper
Part of: Structures Congress 2005: Metropolis and Beyond
Abstract: The New York Times Building, currently under construction in New York City, is a study of balance and compromise. The vision of The New York Times to create a building ahead of the times was balanced by the goals of real estate developer Forest City Ratner to develop an economically efficient building to maximize their leasable space on the upper floors. The innovative European-style architectural design of architect Renzo Piano Building Workshop was blended with the understanding of local building code and practice by New York architect Fox & Fowle Architects. One of the principal architectural features of the building, the expression of exterior steel, involved the compromise of aesthetic appearance, structural adequacy, and fabrication and erection practicality. The thermal movements of this exterior steel provided a great engineering challenge in attempting to balance the movements of interior and exterior steel to limit large differentials. The duality of each aspect of the building design from the ownership and design team partnerships to the overall balance between innovation and efficiency provided numerous engineering design challenges. This paper will outline some of these challenges, focusing on those driven by aesthetic, erection, and fabrication considerations of the exterior steel.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Aesthetics
Commercial buildings
High-rise buildings
New York
New York City
Structural design