American Society of Civil Engineers


Temporary Solidification of Coarse Grained Soil by Magnetorheological Fluids


by Roman D. Hryciw, M.ASCE, (Professor and Graduate Student, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125) and Endra Susila, (Professor and Graduate Student, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125)
Section: Soil Dynamics Symposium to Honor Professor Richard D. Woods, pp. 1-14, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/40780(159)9)

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Document type: Conference Proceeding Paper
Part of: Soil Dynamics Symposium in Honor of Professor Richard D. Woods
Abstract: Magnetorheological fluids (MRFs) are suspensions of micron-sized, magnetizable particles in a base fluid such as water, oil, or silicon, that freely transition from fluid to semi-fluid to solid states when subjected to magnetic fields. The present paper explores the usage of MRFs to temporarily solidify coarse-grained soils. The laboratory testing program included hydraulic conductivity tests of MRF through Ottawa 20–30 sand; bender element tests to investigate how small strain shear modulus varies with applied magnetic field strength, and direct shear tests to evaluate the strength of MRF-solidified soil. The tests revealed that solidification of a soil with MRF results in very large increases in small strain shear modulus and strength and considerable reduction in hydraulic conductivity. However, only medium to coarse sands could be permeated by the MRF as clogging of the pores occurs in finer-grained materials. Practical applications for MRF-solidification and future research needs are discussed.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Coarse-grained soils
Magnetic fields
Solidification