American Society of Civil Engineers


Ceramic Membrane Filtration: An Alternative Wet Weather Management Technology


by Ronald D. Neufeld, Ph.D., P.E., DEE, (Professor of Civil Engineering, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261), John Bendick, (Graduate student, Environmental Engineering Program, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261), Betty J. Kindle, (Manager, Laboratory Services; Allegheny County Sanitary Authority, 3300 Preble Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15233-1092), Charles Miller, (Graduate student, Environmental Engineering Program, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261), and Radisav D. Vidic, Ph.D., (Professor of Civil Engineering, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261)

pp. 1-8, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/40737(2004)63)

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Document type: Conference Proceeding Paper
Part of: Critical Transitions in Water and Environmental Resources Management
Abstract: A pilot scale investigation was undertaken at the Allegheny County Sanitary Authority (ALCOSAN) for approximately 14 months to evaluate the feasibility of cross-flow ceramic membrane microfiltration for the treatment of primary sewage effluent simulating combined and sanitary sewer overflows. Ceramic membranes of various pores sizes (0.05 – 1.4 microns) were tested to understand the impact of cross flow velocity, transmembrane pressures, and inlet suspended solids on permeate water quality and flux rate. A 0.2 micron membrane operated with a 1.8 m/s cross flow velocity, a transmembrane pressure less than 2.1 bar and a backpulse frequency of 60 seconds was selected as the preferred operating conditions. Permeate from this membrane had virtually undetectable levels of fecal coliforms, e-Coli, enterococci, and levels of BOD5 and SS commensurate with secondary treatment expectations. Elevated membrane-feed suspended solids concentration reduces steady state flux rates; a quantification of the influence of feed suspended solids is for the design of multi-stage membrane systems.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Combined sewers
Filtration
Overflow
Precipitation