American Society of Civil Engineers


Evaporation-Induced Self-Assembly of Colloidal Particles into Two-Dimensional Array during Drying


by Hiroyuki Nishikawa, (Department of Chemical System Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan. Contact E-mail: nisikawa@chemsys.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp), Shinya Maenosono, (Department of Chemical System Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan), Yukio Yamaguchi, (Department of Chemical System Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan), and Tatsuya Okubo, (Department of Chemical System Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan)

pp. 255-258, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/40647(259)45)

     Access full text
     Purchase Subscription
     Permissions for Reuse  

Document type: Conference Proceeding Paper
Part of: Discrete Element Methods: Numerical Modeling of Discontinua
Abstract: Self-assembly is a promising process from fundamental and industrial points of view. A bottom-up type process for the fabrication of nanostructure is much less expensive and much more efficient in energy consumption than a top-down type process, such as photolithography. For example, two-dimensional arrays of colloidal particles can be fabricated by drying process of colloidal dispersion. These materials are applicable to optical devices, lithographic masks, and so on. However, it is still difficult to obtain highly ordered arrays in large area by drying process. To improve the degree of the order first, one needs to understand the dynamics of evaporation-induced self-assembling process dominated by capillary immersion force. We modeled self-assembling process of colloidal particles induced by capillary immersion force with Discrete Element Method. This method has been applied to various phenomena related to powder technology. The concentration of colloidal dispersion and the frictional force between colloidal particles are varied in this study. The dependence of the degree of the order for two-dimensional array is studied using Voronoi Polygon analysis.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Evaporation
Particles
Dewatering
Discrete elements