American Society of Civil Engineers


Pawleys Island Profile Change Analysis Using Beach Morphology Analysis Package


by Chris Mack, (Senior Coastal Engineer, US Army Corps of Engineers — Charleston District, 69-A Hagood Avenue, Charleston, SC 29403-5107 E-mail: chris.j.mack@usace.army.mil)

pp. 623-634, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/40605(258)54)

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Document type: Conference Proceeding Paper
Part of: Solutions to Coastal Disasters ’02
Abstract: Analysis of coastal processes at Pawleys Island, SC, particularly beach profile change has been enhanced through the use of the US Army Corps of Engineers’ Beach Morphology Analysis Package (BMAP). This tool provides rapid, efficient, qualitative and quantitative assessments of historical and predictive beach profile change. BMAP provides several useful applications including linear interpolation to calculate an average profile for a series of profiles with an option to compute and display the standard deviation, minimum envelope, and maximum envelope of profile change. BMAP also has the capability to compute volumetric change, both total and sectional volumes defined by starting and ending boundaries and a vertical datum. Similarly, cut and fill areas between two profiles can be calculated. In addition, BMAP can compute contour recession changes for a particular vertical datum and selected profiles, which is useful in estimating short-term and long-term erosion rates. In this analysis, BMAP is applied to historical data sets of Pawleys Island, South Carolina including beach profile surveys from 1990 to 2001, extending from the dune face to approximately 4000 ft (1.2 km) offshore. Qualitative and quantitative estimates of volume and contour position rates of change are computed for use in the Pawleys Island Storm Damage Reduction Study currently being conducted by the Charleston District Corps of Engineers.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Beach erosion
Coastal environment
Coastal management
Seismic effects
Shoreline changes
South Carolina