American Society of Civil Engineers


Innovative Tidal Wetlands Mitigation for a Light Rail Design-Build-Operate-Maintain (DBOM) Project in New Jersey


by Richard A. Masters, P.E., M.ASCE, (Director of Engineering, Normandeau Associates, Inc., 25 Nashua Road, Bedford, NH 03110), Curtis W. Helm, (Project Manager, Amy S. Green Environmental Consultants, Inc., 18 Commerce Street Plaza, Flemington, NJ 08822), Anne Mardirossian, (Environmental Scientist, Amy S. Green Environmental Consultants, Inc., 18 Commerce Street Plaza, Flemington, NJ 08827), Bruce Colvin, Ph.D., (Bechtel Infrastructure Corporation, 1 Executive Plaza Suite 5, Moorestown, NJ 08057), Lee E. Carbonneau, (Senior Scientist, Normandeau Associates, Inc., 25 Nashua Road, Bedford, NH 03110), and Jeffrey S. Simmons, (Senior Scientist, Normandeau Associates, Inc., 251 Main Street, Yarmouth, ME 04096)
Section: Innovative Approaches to Wetland Mitigation, pp. 1-11, (doi:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/40581(2001)37)

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Document type: Conference Proceeding Paper
Part of: Wetlands Engineering & River Restoration 2001
Abstract: New Jersey Transit is constructing the Southern New Jersey Light Rail Transit System (SNJLRTS), a 55 kilometer (34 mile)-long light rail corridor between Camden and Trenton, New Jersey. The project is needed to relieve growing levels of traffic congestion, expand economic opportunities that are impeded by an aging and obsolete transportation infrastructure, improve air quality and noise conditions, and reduce urban sprawl. The rail project involves the replacement, rehabilitation, removal, and/or realignment of rail track, ties, and trackbed; the installation of new track, rail crossovers, switches and other related facilities; construction of 20 station stops and park and ride facilities; construction of a yard and shop facility and a layover facility; replacement or rehabilitation of several bridges; and reconstruction of roadways. Through careful planning efforts, the permanent disturbance of wetlands along the 55 kilometer (34 mile) corridor was limited to less than 1.2 hectares (3 acres) and the temporary disturbance of less than 1300 square meters (one-third acre). The majority of these impacts are to tidally influenced wetlands along the Delaware River and tributaries. The permit conditions for this project required mitigation to compensate for impacts on State and Federally regulated wetlands and open waters. This paper discusses interesting elements of the mitigation project for both the process of getting from conceptual design to implementation through an innovative contractual process, and the technical issues encountered, including tidal hydrology, invasive species control, and historic resource protection.


ASCE Subject Headings:
Construction management
Light rail transit
New Jersey
Remediation
Wetlands