As I See It: Remember the DEW Line? The Evolution of Ground-Level Vibration Criteria from the Cold War Years to the Era of Nanoelectronics

by Richard D. Woods, P.E., Ph.D., Emeritus Professor of Geotechnical Engineering; Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, rdw@umich.edu,
, D.GE

Serial Information: Geo-Strata —Geo Institute of ASCE, 2017, Vol. 21, Issue 4, Pg. 20-22


Document Type: Editorial

Abstract: Most of my graduate students today do not know about the DEW (Distant Early Warning) Line that was the cornerstone of the United States' air defense arsenal during the Cold War (1947-1991). The DEW Line was the nothernmost of three lines of radar stations across North America designed to provide early detection and characterization of Soviet bombers and land or sea invasions. An advanced design was used for the radar antennae that came with stringent ground motion (i.e., vibration) tolerances.

Subject Headings: Nanomechanics | Radar | Ground motion | Students | Explosions | Seas and oceans | Vibration | United States | North America

 

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