Review of Stabilization of Clays and Expansive Soils in Pavements and Lightly Loaded Structures—History, Practice, and Future

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by Thomas M. Petry, P.E., (F.ASCE),
Dallas N. Little, P.E., (F.ASCE),

Abstract: Expansive clay soils—those that change significantly in volume with changes in water content—are the cause of distortions to structures that cost taxpayers several billion dollars annually in the United States. Much has been learned about their behavior over the past 60 years, and relatively successful methods have been developed to modify and stabilize them. This paper reviews some of the key advances developed over the past 60 years in improving our understanding of the nature and methods of modifying and stabilizing expansive clay soils. The state of the practice in stabilization is presented, and practical and research needs to help improve the state of the practice are discussed.

Subject Headings: Clays | Expansive soils | Soil stabilization | Soil water | Water content | Distortion (structural) | Pavements | Load factors | United States | North America


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