Shake, Rattle and Hold (Available in Structural Engineering Special Issue Only)

by Chris P. Pantelides, P.E., (M.ASCE), Assoc. Prof.; Civ. & Envir. Engrg. Dept., Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah,
Evert C. Lawton, P.E., (M.ASCE), Assoc. Prof.; Civ. & Envir. Engrg. Dept., Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah,
Lawrence D. Reaveley, P.E., (M.ASCE), Prof.; Civ. & Envir. Engrg. Dept., Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah,
Scott Merry, P.E., (M.ASCE), Asst. Prof.; Civ. & Envir. Engrg. Dept., Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah,


Serial Information: Civil Engineering—ASCE, 1998, Vol. 68, Issue 12, Pg. 8A-11A


Document Type: Feature article

Abstract: In-situ lateral load tests of two bridge bents were conducted on Interstate 15 in Salt Lake City, Utah, to determine the strength and ductility of an existing concrete bridge and the improvements that can be achieved using a fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) composite retrofit. The design of the composite was developed based on rational guidelines for the columns, cap beam, and cap beam-column joints to provide a specific displacement ductility. Good correlation between analytical and experimental results was observed, which included the yield level of the members, the peak lateral load, and the location of plastic hinges. The composite strengthened the cap beam-column joints effectively for an increase in shear stresses of 35%. The retrofitted bent reached a displacement ductility of 10—twice that of the as-built bent— while the peak lateral load capacity was increased by 18%. The performance, response, and behavior of the pile foundation systems supporting the bridge bents, and the geopier foundation systems supporting the structural reaction frame, were monitored during the tests. Both types of foundation systems, which were subjected to large compressive, uplift, and lateral loads during the tests, performed well.

Subject Headings: Concrete bridges | Fiber reinforced plastics | Rehabilitation

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