Brownfields by the Book

by John McGharen, P.E., (M.ASCE), Partner; Pitney, Hardin, Kipp and Szuch, Morristown, NJ,
William S. Hatfield, Assoc.; Pitney, Hardin, Kipp and Szuch, Morristown, NJ,


Serial Information: Civil Engineering—ASCE, 1998, Vol. 68, Issue 11, Pg. 42-45


Document Type: Feature article

Abstract: To spur the redevelopment of brownfield properties, many state legislatures have passed laws that allow developers to revitalize contaminated industrial sites without the high risks or costs associated with environmental cleanups. Two projects, the Roebling site in New Jersey and the Fike Chemical Superfind site in West Virginia, are examples of successful brownfield projects. At the Roebling site, developers employed unconventional methods when several feet of lead-contaminated top soil was moved to be used later as fill for parking area. This allowed developers to accommodate a new arena's construction specifications and encapsulated the lead contaminated top soil was moved to be used later as fill for a parking area. This allowed developers to accommodate a new arena's construction specifications and encapsulated the lead contamination, thereby achieving the goals of both the state and the developers. At the Fike Chemical Superfund site, decades of industrial waste created one of the worst sites in the country. Cleanup strategies and responsibility was negotiated between developers, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and potentially responsible parties. State legislation regarding brownfields usually encourages developers to remediate contaminated property by including incentive such as liability relief or covenants not to sue, greater flexibility in cleanup standards, relaxed remediation requirements, tax relief and promises of no further action letters.

Subject Headings: Brownfields | Hazardous wastes | Land reclamation | Remediation | Waste sites

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