Demolishing NAPLs

by Jess L. Yow, Jr., (M.ASCE), Program Leader; Environmental Technologies Program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550,
Roger D. Aines, Group Leader; Geochemistry, Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550,
Robin L. Newmark, Group Leader; Geology and Geophysics, Earth Science Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550,


Serial Information: Civil Engineering—ASCE, 1995, Vol. 65, Issue 8, Pg. 57-59


Document Type: Feature article

Abstract: Dynamic Underground Stripping is a combination of in situ steam injection, electrical resistance heating, and fluid extraction for rapid removal and recovery of subsurface contaminants such as solvents or fuels. Underground imaging and other measurement techniques monitor the system in situ for process control. Field tests at a deep gasoline spill at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory recovered over 26,500 liters (7000 gallons) of gasoline during several months of field operations. Preliminary analysis of system cost and performance indicate that Dynamic Underground Stripping compares favorably with conventional pump-and-treat methods and vacuum extraction schemes for removing nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) such as gasoline from deep subsurface plumes.

Subject Headings: Environmental issues | Fuels | Gasoline | Pollutants | Remediation | Stripping | Subsurface investigations

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