The Fraser River Delta, British Columbia: Architecture, Geological Dynamics and Human Impact

by J. L. Luternauer, Geological Survey of Canada, Vancouver, Canada,
J. J. Claque, Geological Survey of Canada, Vancouver, Canada,
J. A. M. Hunter, Geological Survey of Canada, Vancouver, Canada,
S. E. Pullan, Geological Survey of Canada, Vancouver, Canada,
M. C. Roberts, Geological Survey of Canada, Vancouver, Canada,
D. J. Woeller, Geological Survey of Canada, Vancouver, Canada,
R. A. Kostaschuk, Geological Survey of Canada, Vancouver, Canada,
T. F. Moslow, Geological Survey of Canada, Vancouver, Canada,
P. A. Monahan, Geological Survey of Canada, Vancouver, Canada,
B. S. Hart, Geological Survey of Canada, Vancouver, Canada,



Document Type: Proceeding Paper

Part of: Deltas of the World

Abstract: The Fraser river delta is the largest delta in western Canada. It is an important coastal ecosystem and an area of explosive urban and industrial growth lying within the most seismically active zone in Canada. The main geological hazards are failures of the delta; slope and earthquake-induced liquefaction. Deposition at the river mouth contributes to slope failures, including one of more than 1×106 m3 with a headscrap within 100 m of a staffed lighthouse. Previous discharge of treated sewage onto the tidal flats has led to the concentration of toxic metals and organic detritus. Causeways and other large engineering structures have altered sediment and water dispersal patterns and contributed to the erosion of some coastal habitats. Erosion of the tidal flats also may be aggravated by dredging of sand to maintain channels and provide construction material.

Subject Headings: Geology | Sediment | Human factors | Architecture | Rivers and streams | Tides | Failure analysis | Earthquakes | Ecosystems | Sewage | Slopes | North America | Canada | British Columbia | Western Canada

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