Use of Geographic Information Processing for the Identification of Indirect Impacts Associated with Regulatory Permitting Programs: For Now, a Conceptual Model

by Robert H. Dunlap, South Carolina Marine Resources, Center, Charleston, United States,
Dwayne E. Porter, South Carolina Marine Resources, Center, Charleston, United States,



Document Type: Proceeding Paper

Part of: Coastal Zone '93

Abstract: The utilization of Geographic Information Processing (GIP) for the identification and assessment of direct impacts to coastal ecosystems allowed under the guidelines of regulatory permitting systems is being adopted by many federal, state, and municipal agencies. Recent work utilizing GIP for measuring and modeling the cumulative impacts of physical alterations to coastal wetlands in South Carolina allowed under regulatory permitting programs suggests a need to identify and assess the secondary, or indirect, impacts to coastal ecosystems that accumulate as a result of regulatory perturbations which occur and accumulate as a result of permit decision making process. Historically, these indirect impacts have been difficult to identify and quantify. Preliminary work suggests that cumulatively these indirect impacts may alter coastal ecosystems more so than the regulatory permitted activities. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a conceptual mode which utilizes the tools of GIP for identifying and assessing not only the direct impacts to wetlands of coastal ecosystems allowed under regulatory guidelines but to also identify indirect impacts.

Subject Headings: Wetlands (coastal) | Coastal processes | Geographic information systems | Ecosystems | Information systems | Systems management | South Carolina | North America | United States

Services: Buy this book/Buy this article

 

Return to search