Pressure Suit Requirements for Moon and Mars EVA's

by Eric M. Jones, Earth and Environmental Sciences Los, Alamos Natl Lab, Los Alamos, United States,
Harrison H. Schmitt, Earth and Environmental Sciences Los, Alamos Natl Lab, Los Alamos, United States,



Document Type: Proceeding Paper

Part of: Engineering, Construction, and Operations in Space III

Abstract: In this paper, we examine the influence of pressure suit and backpack designs on astronaut productivity and on the frequency with which EVA's can be conducted during lunar base operations and during long stays on the martian surface. The Apollo experience suggests that the EVA equipment of that era had a short enough useful life that, in the context of extended missions it would have to be considered a 'consumable'. The consumption rate is estimated to be 8 kg/day under optimal conditions. Consequently, in planning for extended missions, attention must be paid to issues of durability and, also, onsite maintenance and repair in order to reduce the number of suits which must be transported to the Moon or Mars. The Apollo experience also indicates that improvements in mobility and suit flexibility can have a significant impact on astronaut productivity. Improvements in manual dexterity and reduction of forearm fatigue and abrasion-induced damage to the hands would have the greatest impact.

Subject Headings: Moon | Space exploration | Space colonies | Mars | Equipment and machinery | Fatigue (material) | Flight

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