Coordinated Management of Coastal Waters in the New York-New Jersey-Connecticut Region

by Seth Ausubel, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, New York, United States,
Robert Dieterich, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, New York, United States,
Barbara Finazzo, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, New York, United States,
Robert Nyman, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, New York, United States,
Janice Rollwagen, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, New York, United States,
Eric Stern, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, New York, United States,
M. Tedesco, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, New York, United States,



Document Type: Proceeding Paper

Part of: Coastal Zone '91

Abstract: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region II is currently funding three major water quality planning efforts for the coastal waters in the New York-New Jersey-Connecticut region. Close coordination of planning efforts involving the Long Island Sound, New York-New Jersey Harbor, and the New York Bight is essential for effective environmental management. These three systems function as a single ecosystem, linked by interactive physical, chemical, and biological processes. Control actions taken in one component of the system may affect water quality in other parts of the system. Complex hydrodynamic and biological processes in the system make such interactions difficult to assess and predict. Furthermore, there is a need to evaluate the effects on the region's regulated community of the management strategies each program reccommends. A case study on the integration of these programs regarding the question of nutrient management system-wide will be explored. Nutrient and organic enrichment, and resultant hypoxia, is a major area of concern in all three programs. Program coordination for nutrient management encompasses technical and policy issues. Study components include mathematical modelling, monitoring, transfer of nutrient control technologies via demonstration projects, integrated public involvement efforts, and the consideration of regional priorities for nutrient control in light of political and economic commitments for management of sewage sludge and combined sewer overflow.

Subject Headings: Sea water | Water quality | Coastal management | Nutrients | Case studies | Biological processes | Ecosystems | Systems management | North America | United States | New York | New Jersey | Connecticut

Services: Buy this book/Buy this article

 

Return to search