Projects That Point

by Teresa Austin, Asst. Editor; Civil Engineering Magazine, ASCE World Headquarters, 345 East 47th Street, New York City, NY.,


Serial Information: Civil Engineering—ASCE, 1990, Vol. 60, Issue 10, Pg. 70-77


Document Type: Feature article

Abstract: This is only a small sampling of what we can expect inthis decade. An $80 million kiln at Port Arthur, Tex., reportedly the largest of its kind in the U.S., handles bulk solids and sludges. At the forefront of the solar movement is the Luz Solar Electric Generating Systems, 140 mi northeast of Los Angeles. The Central Arizona Project will wash a large portion of Arizona's deserts with Colorado River water when it is completed in the middle of this decade. London's Canary Wharf at the Docklands is defining the term megaprojectfor the '90s. France's Marseilles Civic building is designed to cut energy needs by as much as 45%. Toll roads wil make a comeback in the '90s as evidenced by Houston's $838 million Harris County Toll Road, the $277 million project between Dulles International airport and Leesburg, Va. and Denver's $500 E-470 Beltway, a 48 mi toll road that will loop around the eastern half of the city. Taipei, Taiwan's Fetsui Reservoir is the focal point of a long-range water supply development program. The U.S. will build the Superconducting Super Collider, the world's largest atom smasher. Three acres of pristine land will be studied in Biosphere II. A 265 mi system linking Anaheim, Calif. and Las Vegas, Nev., could be the first large-scale maglev route in the country. Japan is building an offshore airport on a man-made island about 5 km out in Osaka Bay. The Department of Energy has awarded a $7.2 million matching grant for mine-assisted oil recovery techniques. New York City is mapping its water system on computer.

Subject Headings: Civil engineering | Construction management

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