A Review of the South Carolina Method for Establishing Coastal Setback Lines

by Christopher P. Jones, Coastal Science & Engineering, Inc, United States,
William C. Eiser, Coastal Science & Engineering, Inc, United States,



Document Type: Proceeding Paper

Part of: Barrier Islands: Process and Management

Abstract: The location of the setback line will depend to a large extent on the nature of the shoreline. Those areas adjacent to an unstabilized tidal inlet and affected by coastal processes at the inlet have been classified as unstabilized inlet erosion zones. Setbacks in these zones must be measured from the most landward point of erosion in the past 40 years, unless detailed studies show that the shoreline is unlikely to return to its former location. Areas that are not directly influenced by a tidal inlet have been classified as standard erosion zones. Setbacks in standard erosion zones are measured from the 'ideal dune crest'. The ideal dune crest can be thought of as the actual dune crest in natural areas. Areas adjacent to tidal inlets that have been stabilized by jetties, terminal grains or other structures have been classified as stabilized inlet erosion zones. Setbacks in stabilized inlet erosion zones are determined in a manner similar to that in standard erosion zones.

Subject Headings: Inlets (waterway) | Erosion | Tides | Coastal environment | Sea water | Dunes | Shoreline | South Carolina | North America | United States

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