Preliminary Results of the Department of the Interior's Irrigation Drainage Studies

by Marc A. Sylvester, US Geological Survey, United States,
Jonathan P. Deason, US Geological Survey, United States,
Herman R. Feltz, US Geological Survey, United States,
Richard A. Engberg, US Geological Survey, United States,



Document Type: Proceeding Paper

Part of: Planning Now for Irrigation and Drainage in the 21st Century

Abstract: The Department of the Interior, in 1986, began irrigation drainage studies in nine areas in seven Western states to determine whether irrigation drainage has caused or has the potential to cause harmful effects on human health, fish, and wildlife, or might reduce the suitability of water for beneficial uses. Results of the seven studies completed in 1987 are presented and are compared to baselines, standards, criteria, and other guidelines helpful for assessing the potential of observed constituent concentrations in water, bottom sediment, and biota to result in physiological harm to fish, wildlife, or humans. Selenium is the constituent most commonly found at elevated concentrations in water, bottom sediment, and biota in the study areas. Additional study results are discussed.

Subject Headings: Irrigation | Drainage | Fish management | Wildlife | Health hazards | Sediment

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