Fish Histopathology and Contamination in California's Channel Islands

by Edwin M. Perkins, Univ of Southern California, Los, Angeles, CA, USA,
Allan B. Chartrand, Univ of Southern California, Los, Angeles, CA, USA,
Robert W. Risebrough, Univ of Southern California, Los, Angeles, CA, USA,
David B. Ebenstein, Univ of Southern California, Los, Angeles, CA, USA,



Document Type: Proceeding Paper

Part of: Coastal Zone '87

Abstract: Ocean dumping of certain hazardous wastes took place at two dumpsites in the San Pedro Channel of the Southern California Bight from the 1940s through the 1960s. This included some 700 metric tons of acid waste generated from a nearby DDT manufacturing firm in south Los Angeles. Present concerns center on possible continuing environmental effects of these dumping practices, in addition to advection by prevailing ocean currents in the Southern California Bight. Because some pollutants are transmitted through the marine food web, fish could be developing disease linked with chronic exposures. Likewise, contaminated fish consumed by people could elevate health risk associated with seafood consumption. Liver tissue of one target species (kelp bass) was analyzed for chemical contaminants and examined microscopically for evidence of histopathology. An attempt is made to correlate the prevalence of hepatic idiopathies with concentrations of contaminant residues found in these tissues.

Subject Headings: Fish management | Islands | Pollution | Ocean currents | Ocean engineering | Health hazards | Light rail transit | Hazardous wastes | North America | California | United States | Los Angeles

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