An Innovative Analysis of Port Development Impacts on a Coastal National Wildlife Refuge

by James D. Brown, US Fish & Wildlife Service, Atlanta, GA, USA,
Edwin M. EuDaly, US Fish & Wildlife Service, Atlanta, GA, USA,
John P. Davis, US Fish & Wildlife Service, Atlanta, GA, USA,



Document Type: Proceeding Paper

Part of: Coastal Zone '87

Abstract: Development at Savannah Harbor, Georgia, has resulted in an upstream movement of salt water in the lower Savannah River system. Increased salinity has adversely affected and complicated the management of freshwater wetlands on the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge and degraded striped bass spawning habitat. Proposed harbor expansion would cause further salinity increases and potentially make freshwater wetlands management impossible. In response to this situation, the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service initiated a comprehensive 3-year study in 1985 involving the use of hydrodynamic and biological models to evaluate the impacts of harbor development alternatives and develop effective mitigation measures to protect the valuable fish and wildlife resources of Savannah National Wildlife Refuge and the lower Savannah River system.

Subject Headings: Wildlife | Ports and harbors | Coastal environment | Innovation | Fresh water | Wetlands (coastal) | Rivers and streams | Salinity | River systems | Salt water | North America | Georgia | United States

Services: Buy this book/Buy this article

 

Return to search